Why didn't Gary Snyder, an American man of letters, get married after getting into divorce with his second wife, Joanne Kyger?

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Guys! You must be curious about why Gary Snyder didn't get married after getting into divorce with his second wife, Joanne Kyger?? And now we have a hot news scoop of it.

Gary got married to his first wife Alison Gass in 1950 and got divorced in 1953. His close friends have to say that Gary used to be very reserved back then. This might be the very reason behind his first divorce.

 Gary, then married Joanne Kyger in 1960. Before tying the knot, Gary and Joanne dated for almost three years. They were regarded as one of the most romantic couples back then. However, even this marriage could not last long. They got divorced in 1965.  Given that the couple were very happy back then, the divorce was something uncalled for. The reason behind the event has not been disclosed to the public.

Now at the age of 85, Gary has to say that he still misses Joanne. So, she must be the last woman he loved. And ever since he did not marry anyone or dated anyone.

Gary Snyder is an American man of letters. The man is best acclaimed for being a poet. He has often been associated with the Beat Generation and the San Francisco Renaissance.

Gary is also an essayist, lecturer and an environmental activist. His essays and poems have been translated to many languages around the world. He has been described as the "poet laureate of Deep Ecology".

In the review of books in London, the famous British poet and essayist, Iain Sinclair rated Gary an A class poet who is successful to grab many audience out there with his inexpressive ways.

 “Snyder’s rhetorically spare and inexpressive poetics are often attributed to the influence of Zen Buddhism, but what if Gary Snyder was attracted to Zen because his psyche is spare and his mind inexpressive?” He writes.

He says the poet not only describes Gary’s writing style but also comments on the height of Gary being an introvert.

Snyder is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry and the American Book Award. His works often reflect an immersion in both Buddhists spirituality and nature. He has translated literature into English from ancient Chinese and modern Japanese. He is multilingual, speaking more than ten languages.

Turtle Island, 1974; The Real Work, 1980; A Place in Space, 1995; Mountains and Rivers Without End, 1996 are some of his notable works.

For over a decade, Snyder served as a faculty member at the University of California, Davis and he also served California Arts Council for some years.